Reviews

5
1 vote

As an prior medical school educator and African American female physician, I found it very factual and much needed! The fact is, we need more AA physicians period, but its a shame that we have so few black males. We need all of us to work hard to increase our numbers in medical school, males and females, to help decrease health disparities. Health disparities will not improve until that happens. Mentorship programs and pipeline programs are key to helping increase these numbers as well as improving the diversity of those that sit on the admissions committees. I was one of those sitting on the admissions committee. I advocated for a more holistic approach which has made some difference. Thanks again for such a wonderful program.
I would add one last thing, we need more of physician to consider becoming medical school faculty so our AA students can see more of us!

5
1 vote

My perspective is that of a white male. Thank you for helping me see through eyes of these black males. I can especially relate to the several examples of how life-changing it can be to help kids and young adults see themselves in roles that didn't seem accessible until someone showed them the path, helped them connect their present self with a possible future self.

All of us have unique personal experiences that we carry these things around with us every day. Most of them are invisible -- mental health, financial situations, academic background, religion, sexuality, family and marital status, car troubles, noisy neighbors, and on and on. They are very real. They shape how we interact with the world, they give us confidence in certain situations and take away confidence in others, and they define the boundaries of how we can imagine ourselves.

But these invisible attributes don't immediately trigger other people into automatic responses so that they treat us differently right from the very first interaction. There is added layer of feedback reinforcing limitations on what we can do. How could they? They are invisible.

Race and gender are powerfully visible traits. They do trigger immediate reactions -- for better and for worse -- that shape our interactions. We would like to think that we treat all people the same. Many of us are absolutely convinced that they do. But the data say otherwise. Being aware of the reality that our colleagues are facing is a first step towards making improvements. Thank you for sharing these perspectives.

5
1 vote

My father was a physician. A bi-racial male in the early 20's - he want ALL his children to go to medical school.
The documentary triggered a memory. When asked why he decide to be a physician, he said:
"I saw this doctor making house call and riding in a buggy and I said to myself - I want to be like him" Now, he grew up in Guyana - a small poor country in South America, mostly black and poor. He struggled to get into medical school, he struggled in medical school. But just like the documentary says someone took his under his wing and he made it. Now this was in the early 20's. So this issues has been long standing. You have to see it to believe that you can be it.

As to his children - of the four, two of us ended being physicians.

5
1 vote

I think it is extremely telling that the number of black men represented in medical schools across our country has significantly declined. Diversity, equity and inclusion has to be baked into all aspects of our lives. We will all WIN!

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